So many threads…

First, a highlight – a visit from my daughter Michelle last weekūüôā. It was great to have her here, & introduce her to my team-mates. I enjoyed showing her around the Old City & sharing some stories about our work. I was pleased she’d also planned various tours to the main Holy Sites. So when I’m home we’ll be able to talk about the land & the issues of the Occupation with a shared ‘back story’. Here she is¬†[left]¬†one free eveniJerus. lights show 4.6.15 009ng when we enjoyed exploring Jerusalem’s ‘Festival of Light.’
With only a few days left in the Placement, there’s a lot to do as we finish up here & prepare to re-enter our own cultures. We’ve commented that many things have started to ‘gel’ for us now, with parts of our experience coming together. As an example, it’s easier to remember Arabic words & people’s names; & the place-names mean more! We’ve become ‘old hands’ at finding our way around the winding streets of the Old City. Just a shame it’s so late in the process.ūüôā

Among the kaleidoscope of memories over the last few days was a significant conversation ¬†withDome of the Rock 23 Apr 004 the Director of Properties at Al Aqsa Mosque Compound. He didn’t know much about EAPPI., but listened with interest to a description of the work we do to assist Muslim worshippers. He even offered to take each new Jerusalem EA team on a tour of the Mosque Compound [right]¬†which would be an amazing experience.

We also attended the weekly ‘Women in Black’ & Sheikh Jarrah demonstrations, this time commemorating the 48th anniversary of the Occupation of East Jerusalem [1967]. There were more protesters than usual. At Sheikh Jarrah, in our neighbourhood, there was a festive atmosphere with drummers, rappers & much good energy! Then local Israeli settlers [against whose actions the protest is held] called the police & there were some arrests made. ¬†Fortunately we’ve just heard that the 3 men were later released without charge.

During the week, on a Placement Visit to Bethlehem, I was introduced to the ‘Monastery de l’Immanuel’ which is quite close to the placement house & Separation Wall. We heard how a well-known icon ‘writer’ had been requested to paint an icon [below] ¬†on the wall near the monastery. It depicts a pregnant Mary weeping over BBethl. icons 8.6.15 002ethlehem.¬†Some time later, an Israeli artist asked if he could also paint on this part of the wall. The icon ‘writer’ asked whether that work could be done elsewhere; but when he returned a few days later he found this cartoon¬†[left] had appeared next to his icon. The icon ‘writer’ said, ‘It’s just like the Occupation all over again.’

The complex tapestry of life here has so many threads; there are so many layers to every story….

To conclude, 2 images from yesterday…… one, the ugliness oQal. & flower 10.6.15 001f the Separation Wall & a watch tower @ Qalandia Check Point, between Jerusalem & Ramallah – a place we’re very familiar with¬†[ right];

the second, this beautiful climbing plant I found on the walk home from the bus stop¬†[below left] . Wherever¬†there is ugliness, something of beauty can be found helping to correct the balance, if we have eyes to see.¬†Qal. & flower 10.6.15 003I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The opinions expressed here are personal, & may not reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the W.C.C. If you would like to publish the information contained here, including posting on a website, please first contact the Advocacy officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you.¬†

Looking for signs of hope.

Sometimes it seems that life in this country is lived in two parallel universes, to quote  an Israeli friend. Israelis & Palestinians experience two very different realities in daily life. We have come  into contact with some groups working to encourage dialogue & increased understanding between the two, but they are in the minority.

On 17th May, thousands of Israelis, mostly young men, celebrated Jerusalem Day. They came from every direction to march through the Old City to the ‘Wailing Wall.’ They were re-enacting 17/5/1967, when towards the end of the 6-day war Israeli troops broke through one of the city gates & took the city from Jordan’s control. The Old City is now annexed to Israel [as part of East Jerusalem]. Palestinians still live there, though life is very difficult for them, & still claim it as their capital.

On Sunday 17th we observed confrontations between the Israeli security forces & Palestinians [residents / shop keepers ] who were being moved away from the city entrances prior to the march, for ‘security reasons.’ ¬†Further up the hill, one group of marchers confronted a smaller group of Israeli protesters053¬†who want to work with¬†rather than¬†against¬†their Palestinian neighbours. One of the protesters¬†turned out to be¬†a young woman from Melbourne, who is undergoing training from New York to become a rabbi. She works towards ‘conflict transformation,’ by facilitating meetings where Jews listen¬†to Palestinians. She told me her desire is to decrease polarisation in the Jewish community.

The triumphalism in the attitude of the thousands of marchers contrasted with the passion of the protest group to defeat racism, & their desire to share the land with their Palestinian neighbours. [Pictured  above Рsecurity forces keep the marchers {left} & protesters apart.]

Just a few days later, EAs from the Jerusalem & Bethlehem teams shared in a farewell evening for Rev. Colin Johnston, a Church of Scotland minister who’d been based at Tiberias. Over 5 years Colin had offered free accommodation for EAs wanting to take their days off beside the Sea of Galilee.

Ninna, from our Jerusalem team, has been teaching dance at the Palestinian Child Centre in Shu’fat refugee camp north of Jerusalem. With the co-operation of the regular dance teacher, Ninna was able to invite the dancers to entertain us with traditional Palestinian dances at Colin’s farewell evening. The girls, dressed in traditional costumes¬†[right],¬†performed their dances with exuberance & pride. And the smiles on their faces were a delight to see. Later, CoColin J's EA-Shu'fat farewell 16.5.15 005lin commented ¬†how moved he was by their performance – that ‘their smiling faces were a sign of hope for Palestine’s future.’

The contrast in behaviour & attitudes of the marching Israeli youths, the protesters, & the Palestinian dancers was fascinating. But there are signs of hope in these ‘parallel universes’, especially if the enthusiasm & passion of young people can be directed towards a positive future.

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The views expressed here are personal, & may not reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the World Council of Churches. If you would like to publish the information contained here [including posting on a website] or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you. ¬†¬†¬†

Seeing with new eyes…

The Jerusalem EA team has led several delegations of international visitors around some sites in the Old City, explaining to them something of our work in the area. We point out the gates to Al Aqsa Mosque Compound where Muslim worshippers should have access; & discuss restrictions on access to worship for Christians during important  festivals such as Easter.

Near the famous Wailing Wall¬†we show¬†the Davidson Centre, where visitors see films about the archaeological excavations being carried out by a firm funded largely by U.S. money. They claim to have found evidence of King David’s era in Jerusalem, & continue tunnelling outside the wall of the Old City to find further evidence. Unfortunately this excavation is being done under a crowded Pales060tinian community called Silwan [named for the Pool of Siloam as we know it]. The pool itself has been incorporated into the expanding tourist area & is now off-limits to local Palestinians.

At their community centre, the local Palestinians describe how cracks appeared in their homes, then a school classroom & street started to collapse. This was the first indication of the tunnelling beneath their homes, & made sense of the noises they’d been hearing. Most of the homes have demolition orders on them, because the aim is to make this area of East Jerusalem into a tourist park. ¬†[Photo, left, with workers’ toilets beside a sign at the entrance to Silwan]. The Arabic street names are progressively being replaced by Hebrew names.

On two occasions after a tour with a delegation, a member has commented to us, ‘Now I see things here with new eyes.’ Our experience over the past two months has been similar, & we wish that more visitors to the beautiful city of Jerusalem could learn about the ‘other story’ that runs alongside the tourist version….

One evening when we were just settling into our placement house in East Jerusalem, we heard young men from the neighbourhood making lots of noise outside our entrance. We were concerned about security, so we made sure the door was locked & closed the blinds on the window that overlooked the street.

A few weeks later, returning after spending time in Haifa at mid-term orientation, we chatted about how different we felt -‘It’s almost like coming home!’ Once more the young men gathered outside our entrance, & much chatter & laughter could be heard. We said to each other, ‘Our neighbours are having a good time tonight!’

We, too, are ‘seeing things here with new eyes.’ūüôā

I am participating as an Accompanier in¬†EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment program in Palestine & Israel. The opinions expressed here are personal, & may not reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the World Council of Churches.If you would like to publish the information contained here [including posting on a website], or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you.

A land of queues

Everywhere we go in the Holy Land, we see queues. There are queues of tourists to see the Al Aqsa Mosque Compound, the 3rd most holy site in Islam. It is a stunningly beautiful group of buildings & worth the wait [left].

008Groups of Orthodox Jewish men often try to gain access to the Compound through one of the 7 gates reserved for Muslim worshippers. They claim the Mosque Compound is built on the site of Herod’s temple[& call it Temple Mount]. The security forces most often turn them away – it is a very provocative action for Jews to pray & worship in this Muslim worship space.

Then there are the Christian pilgrims who queue to see places like the Garden of Gethsemane, or the many churches that mark traditional sites of Jesus’ life & ministry.

The queues that cause most distress are those which Palestinians must join to pass through Check Points, eg. to get into East Jerusalem for work or worship. Last week, Israeli authorities distributed many extra permits for Palestinians, for a special holiday. At Qalandia Check Point, a young father told me he & his family were on their first visit to002¬†Israel for a picnic day. They hoped to get to the Dead Sea, & Jaffa. ‘Why all this?’ he asked¬†[indicating the queue & turnstile]. He was holding his crying baby daughter ¬†as he waited for his wife & older daughter to emerge from a different queue.

The problem was that people on coach trips & family groups all had to process through the Check Point on foot. No extra gates were opened & the human crush was really bad.

At one stage I joined the queue from the Ramallah side, to change places with my team mate on the Jerusalem side. Just as I reached one of the chutes that funnel people through, the shouting from the frustrated crowd grew louder & people began to push from behind. I was ‘carried’ into the chute in this sea of humanity, & could do nothing but wait it out – an uncomfortable but not scary experience. ¬†I couldn’t help thinking that for those around me, such an event is as part of daily life. As one man said angrily on the exit side : ‘This is ¬†bull***t. They give extra permits on a special day but don’t even open an extra gate. There should be more Check Points open for a day like this.’ ¬†[Right – note the women peering back through the exit turnstile to locate their friends/family members].

The day before I’d hiked up the Mt of Olives to join an ecumenical service @ the Lutheran Church of the Ascension. The liturgy concluded with the eucharist, & the invitation indicated that all are welcome. I joined the line of worshippers moving forward, & very soon two people came & stood either side of me. Immediately I was back in the Qalandia Check Point queue where the same thing happens regularly.

But what a difference! At the eucharist we’re invited forward, not forced. The eucha0df9d0feb3f8b243639182482a0092darist is offered as a gift of grace to all who want to receive. We are¬†welcomed as God’s beloved children, & enter the mystery which nourishes us for our journey. If only all the peoples of this land could recognise that dehumanising the other diminishes their own humanity. That they are equally loved by God; & that God is working, with ordinary people, to bring peace with justice in this land, as in every place on earth.

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI., the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The opinions expressed here are personal, & do not necessarily reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the W.C.C. If you would like to publish any information contained here [including posting on a website], please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] ¬†for permission. Thank you.

Seeing Gaza

On the way home from our time in to Haifa, we drove near the Gaza Strip. We were met by Roni, a Jewish woman who’d moved from England & now lives in nearby Netiv Ha’asara village. It is so close to the Gaza Strip that Roni showed us where a tunnel under the border had been discovered & demolished.

11.5.15 Stella Maris, Gaza Strip, Erez crossing 009We could also see Israeli tanks [left, centre] monitoring the border with Gaza.

Originally Roni’s village had been established in the Negev desert & was prospering, with innovative agricultural practices. But the community was required to relocate when the Israeli government returned that land to Egypt as part of a peace deal. ‘Of course, we were compensated for what we had to leave behind,’ Roni told us. [ This made me think of the tens of thousands of Palestinians forced from their land & homes in 1948 who were promised ‘return or compensation’ by UN resolution 194. ]

At their new site, Roni & her neighbours have again established hot houses which produce plenty of vegetables & flowers for sale. And she has a beautiful garden of her own. [below right]11.5.15 Stella Maris, Gaza Strip, Erez crossing 014

Roni described the fear of knowing that a rocket attack from Gaza may come at any time. After a siren sounds, residents have 15 seconds to get to their bomb shelters [ every home has one]. As a result of her own experiences meeting Palestinians, Roni is convinced that the way ahead requires talking & listening, not violence. To this end, she has helped form a group called ‘Other Voice’ which encourages Israeli-Palestinian dialogue. As a first step, they argue that the 8-year-old blockade of Gaza preventing imports & exports must be removed.

Roni regularly visits the notorious Erez crossing, the busiest Check Point between Gaza Strip & Israel [below left]. From here she drives people to medical appointments [for which they need a special permit to cross the bord11.5.15 Stella Maris, Gaza Strip, Erez crossing 016er into Israel – much of Gaza is still rubble]. Roni described a conversation with an elderly Muslim man as she drove him to a hospital appointment. For the sake of his children & grandchildren, she said, he needed to let go of the past & look to the future. Only in that way could the situation begin to change. But what have Palestinians been left with, on which to build this future?

I could not help remembering Roni’s earlier comment that we should not forget the Holocaust in understanding Israel’s story. If 2 peoples are eventually to acknowledge each other’s connection with this land, must we not remember the Palestinians’ suffering in ‘The Nakba’ [The Disaster] of 1948, as well as the Holocaust? It’s not a matter of whose suffering is worse, but of acknowledging great suffering on both sides. That would seem a prerequisite before a just resolution can be achieved.

In our final Morning Reflection @ Haifa, EA Juan from the Philippines had shared with us these words, relevant to all our work as EAs: ‘The table of peace must be spread with food & justice. Without food & justice, there is no peace.’

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI., the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The views expressed here are personal, & may not reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia nor the W.C.C. ¬†If you would like to publish the information contained here [including posting on a website] or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer for permission [ eappi.advocacy@gmail.com]. Thank you.¬†

A circuit-breaker :-)

We’ve just returned from our Mid-Term Orientation, when all EAs ¬†in the team get together for some further learning & some relaxation. While there was some initial reluctance to leave our placements just as we were getting a feel for our communities & tasks, we soon realised how important this time was. I don’t think we understood quite how tired we had become. Several EAs had family members visit to share some of the seminars & time off, which was great.

During the first half of our time here, we had each visited a different placement to get another perspective on work as EAsYad Veshem & Lifta 6.5.15 002 [my visit was to South Hebron Hills]. During M.T.O., it was apparent that people had formed strong connections – some within their teams, & some with people they had visited. There were lots of lively conversations going on among the group.

In Jerusalem we were taken on a tour of the Holocaust Museum [‘Yad Vashem’] which is a very powerful experience. Such horror visited on so many people. The Children’s Memorial is both beautiful & deeply sad. It is a cavernous space lit by candles reflected in glass, where ¬†the names, ages & countries of the 1.5 m children who perished are read aloud.

The museum exit [ left ] offers the visitor this view over Jerusalem, symbolising the opportunity for a new life for Jewish refugees after WW2.

On the same day we went to Lifta village, in a strategic position a little north of Jerusalem. This was one of the first Palestinian villages wYad Veshem & Lifta 6.5.15 014here Israeli troops killed some villagers [1948…] & the remainder fled. They have never been able to return home. I thought this poppy [anemone] flowering in the ruins¬†[right] was another symbol of life that continues after destruction. It was a very beautiful setting, but again there was a deep sense of sadness.

Later in the week we took a bus to Haifa, where we stayed at the beautiful Stella Maris convent. Here we had some further training/speakers [ eg. on de-militarising Israeli society]. And – there was time in the program for relaxation.

I’d managed to contact Tal, our Israeli guide during the 2013 tour of Palestine-Israel. 20150509_152642Fortunately she lives quite near Haifa, & was able to drive over for us to spend the afternoon together. Just to prove there was time for R & R., here I am [left]¬†@ a cafe overlooking the Haifa beach. And yes, the apple strudel was magnificent!

On the way back to Jerusalem the bus took us quite close to the Gaza Strip. We visited a Jewish community set up almost on the border with Gaza, & our hostess described what life is like for them when rockets are launched from Gaza.

On the way home we talked again about how complex is the situation here; & that so often, things are not as they first appear.

I’m participating as an Accompanier in¬†EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The views expressed here are personal, & may not reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the W.C.C. If you would like to publish any information contained here [including posting on a website] or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you.

Protests and courage

One of the tasks for the Jerusalem EA. team is to attend some local demonstrations. Recently we excelled ourselves when some of our team attended three in 24 hoursūüôā.

Two oP1190675f those were among our regular tasks, including a weekly protest called ‘Women in Black’¬†[left]. These are Jewish women who have been demonstrating against the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories for almost 30 years. What struck me as particularly courageous is that they demonstrate at a busy round-about in an Orthodox Jewish area [West Jerusalem], & many of their neighbours abuse them as they drive or walk past.

The other regular demo. was at Sheikh Jarrah near our home in East Jerusalem. It’s also a weekly protest, but this time againsSheikh Jarrah demo. 1.5.15 004t evictions of Palestinians by Israeli settlers who take over their houses with impunity. This is part of an over-all plan to reduce the Palestinian population in Jerusalem to 30% of the total [currently it’s 39%]. How significant it was to see this banner¬†[right] ¬†encouraging local Palestinian people to Keep Hope Alive. This is a real challenge given how many of them live under the threat of eviction, or the demolition of their homes. In an interesting contrast to the ‘Women in Black’ protest, the Sheikh Jarrah protesters were receiving positive reactions as passing drivers tooted, smiled & waved in appreciation.

The evening before we had received a call from our Program Co-ordinator about a demonstration by members of the Ethiopian Jewish community, against racism & police brutality. A security camera on a Tel Aviv building the previous week had recorded Israeli policemen bashing an Ethiopian member of the Defence Force, & the protest in Jerusalem had been organised in response. Busloads of people had travelled to Jerusalem to support the protest.

It took us some time to find the location, although we could hear the noise from a distance. Then fortunately 2 policemen mounted on magnificent black horses passed us, so we began to follow them. We found a large crowd [right]¬†facing an armoured police vehicle & rows of police in riot gear – protecting what we later heard was the home of Israel’s President.EA Ethiopian Protest 30.4.15 017

We didn’t see violence, though a wheelie bin had been set on fire & there was¬†some broken glass around. One onlooker offered the opinion that there was a lot of racism among Israeli police towards people of African descent- ‘It’s just like Baltimore'[!!] was his comment.

The most encouraging aspect of the evening was the people from the local Jewish neighbourhood who were protesting alongside the Ethiopian Jewish community [ below].  There were some very animated conversations among them, along with hugs & smiles. This was a positive image to carry home with us as the crowds began to disperse after a long evening.

EA Ethiopian Protest 30.4.15 013

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI., the World Council of Churches’ ¬†Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine and Israel. The views expressed here are personal, and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia,¬†nor the World Council of Churches. If you would like to publish any of the material here [including posting on a website], or distribute it further, please first contact EAPPI’s Advocacy Officer for permission [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com]. Thank you.¬†

‘They’re really pushing us…’

Qal. queueLast week I had a different experience of the Qalandia Check Point [ which ‘Lonely Planet’ describes as a “construction resembling a maximum-security prison”]. On a Friday, many Palestinians come through here in family groups to pray at the mosque & take advantage of the markets that spring up around the Old City gates.¬†For some reason the movement through the Check Point was dreadfully slow, not helped by the fact that 2 of the security conveyor belts weren’t working so bags needed to be checked by hand.

Soon after we began monitoring, people started to come over to comment on how slow the process was. ‘Christian or Muslim, we all suffer,’ volunteered one woman. ¬†Another said she’d never seen the permit cards processed so slowly. ¬†‘They’re really pushing the Palestinian people’, a man commented. The distance from beginning to end of the Check Point would be no more than 100 metres, & could be crossed in 5 minutes. The man pointed to his watch – it had taken him 40 minutes to get through.

But it got worse – my team mate realised the difficulty & began her own journey through the Check Point to join me at the exit. At one point she sent a message to say she’d been stuck in the queue for 45 minutes & hadn’t moved at all. Not only that, people were crushed together as those at the back tried to push the group ahead.

At the exit, another elderly gentleman joined me. He spoke quite good English, & explained that he & his wife & daughter were on the way to the mosque in Jerusalem to pray. Somehow they’d got into different queues. He had brought a folding stool which he set up as he began to wait for them, occasionally making phone calls. When we were ready to leave 2 hours later,¬†his wife & daughter were still not in sight!

People gathered around the exit turnstile, peering through to see when their family members would come. I saw a young girl become more & more anxious, constantly checking at the turnstile. Men became angry at the long wait; several women were in tears, especially those who’d become separated from family members.

But even worse was seeing the distress of the young children, 3-4 years old, as they emerged from the turnstile after being squashed in a queue between metal bars for almost 2 hours. Several were sobbing, clinging to their mothers’ hands as they walked towards the bus stop. I wondered what could possibly have caused delays this bad; yet as usual there were no explanations.

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine and Israel. The views contained here are personal, & do not necessarily reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Aust., nor the WCC. If you would like to publish the information contained here [including posting on a website] or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you.

Through the eyes of a child…

It’s hard not to wonder about how Palestinian children will view the world they grow up into. Will they have hope for the future? Here are some glimpses of children’s lives, where every aspect is affected by the occupation…

** This EA Sth Hebron Hills sch run 020week I spent time at the South Hebron Hills placement – it is indeed a beautiful country-side. In a nearby community there are school students who must walk through an Israeli settlement to get to their school in the next community. The settler violence against these students was so bad that an Israeli military vehicle now escorts the children through the settlement, before & after their school day. It’s not too often that we see Israeli forces helping the Palestinian people deal with the difficulties of occupation!

On this occasion, EAs were helping to make sure all ran smoothly, and escorting the children part of the way.EA Sth Hebron Hills sch run 025

That afternoon the military vehicle was a little late, which gave an opportunity for EA Paivi to spend time with the children in the shade of the trees as they waited for their escort.

** During the week we also visited Al Bustan Centre in Palestinian East Jerusalem. Bustan is a neighbourhood where most houses are under demolition orders, because the nearby ‘City of David’ is being developed as an Israeli tourist / archaeological attraction. We heard of a Palestinian boy who’d being doing well at school, but then his marks began to plummet & he wasn’t bringing his books to school. When his teacher asked what was in his school bag he opened it & there were his toys. Asked why, he said, ‘I might come back from school & my house would be demolished. I want to still have my toys.’

Given the traumas affecting children of Bustan, local volunteers at the Al Bustan Centre provide a safe place for them to be – playing musical instruments, enjoying craft activities, & going on an annual camp [funded by overseas supporters]. And importantly, the children have access there to the help of social workers & counsellors.EA Shu'fat camp, Al Bustan 30.4.15 021

Near the entrance to the Centre was this example of the children’s art work. It reminded me of the many times I’ve seen children at church activities produce something similar with their hand prints. But what a world of difference between the lives & hopes for the future, depending on where you happen to be born!

 

I am participating as an Accompanier in EAPPI.,¬†the World Council of Churches’ Ecumenical Accompaniment Program in Palestine & Israel. The views contained here are personal, & do not necessarily reflect those of the National Council of Churches in Australia, nor the W.C.C. If you would like to publish the information contained here [including posting on a website] or distribute it further, please first contact the EAPPI. Advocacy Officer [eappi.advocacy@gmail.com] for permission. Thank you.